Canola Watch – July 22, 2020

July 22, 2020

QUIZ – MEET THE BENEFICIALS

While out scouting for insects feeding on pods, you might also find these insects at work. Each of the insects in the quiz will feed on pest insects of canola, which is why we call them “beneficials”. You might also call them Field Heroes.

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POD EATERS: SCOUTING TIPS AND THRESHOLDS

Check pods for feeding from bertha armyworm, diamondback moth larvae, lygus and other pests. If any pod feeders are found, make accurate counts in at least three locations 50 metres apart in each field. Then make spray decisions based on thresholds.

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SCOUTING FOR CLUBROOT: WHY NOW?

One reason… If clubroot is found, you have time to take some focused action on these areas. If the patch is small enough, pull up all the plants that have galls, then cut off the galls and dispose of them.

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DID YOU USE A SCLEROTINIA PREDICTION TOOL?

CCC agronomy director Clint Jurke is looking for farmers who made the decision to spray or not spray fungicide for sclerotinia based on what a sclerotinia stem rot prediction tool – sclerotinia checklist, spore testing or weather station predictions – told them.

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SCLEROTINIA WINDOW AND PRE-HARVEST INTERVAL

The window for fungicide application closes after 50 per cent flower – which is when the field is at its most yellow. Once this “full bloom” starts to wane, spraying must stop.

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EXCESS MOISTURE CAN CAUSE CALCIUM DEFICIENCY AND “RIBBON STEM”

Most Prairie soils have more than enough calcium to satisfy crop needs, but short-term deficiencies can occur in plants under stress from excess moisture.

Saturated soils due to long periods of excess rain make it difficult for canola plants to take up nutrients. In some cases, calcium deficiencies will show up more vividly than other deficiencies, likely due to crop growth stage and the timing or duration of the flooding.

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8 REASONS FOR MISSING PODS

Seeing blanks up canola stems where pods should be? Here are the eight most common causes.

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CONNECTIONS – JULY 22

Canola Watch has many valued connections, including the Canola Council of Canada, SaskCanola, Alberta Canola and Manitoba Canola Growers, as well as research institutions, government extension departments, ag businesses, universities and other commodity groups. This section provides timely support for canola-related projects outside of Canola Watch.

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